…the prodigal returns

Back where we came from, reluctant returnees.

Una Cocina en Yunquera

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It’s the time of year that my readers will get very tired of reading about olives. Olive picking. Nets. Boxer dogs. Wind. Mist. Cold.

But that’s the time of year it is! (Don’t worry, new readers, in summer you will become equally tired of reading about tomatoes!)

It’s too windy (still) today to pick olives, so as I had already finished all the cooking ahead, laundry, and Lujos, there was a dilemna as to how to occupy my time today.

I know, I thought to myself, I’ll write a cookbook!

Odd? Not really. For years now, I’ve been writing down recipes of the campo as our friend Manual cooks. My fear has always been that, as agriculture in this area diminishes, the tradition of cooking a one-pot meal for the workers will die. These days, now that most have cars, farm workers often prefer to drive home for lunch, but in years past, the land owner would cook a meal for everyone. Manuel still does this, and every meal is delicious.

Manuel cooks cazuela

Manuel cooking cazuela

So I have a collection of his recipes ready to go, along with a few of my favourite dishes of the town, so soon everyone will have recipes for sopa, almejas pil-pil, migas and so on.

And one day, hopefully I’ll publish it, and give it to the town as a gift from me, with love.

Author: Ann Larson

One-time IT executive who lives on a 22 acre olive farm in Spain with husband Kenton and 2 boxer dogs. We make Yunquera Gold olive oil, and soap and skincare products from same. We aim to make natural, fresh, and handmade products at affordable prices!

2 thoughts on “Una Cocina en Yunquera

  1. Looking forward to your Spanish recipes. Cuisine from Spain is some of my favorite and I’m always looking for some new recipes to whip up!

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